Food pun swag sale- great for dietitians, chefs and more!

Food pun swag sale- great for dietitians, chefs and more!

If you’re not a dietitian, you’ll wonder what the heck FNCE means. It stands for Food, Nutrition, Conference & Expo and is one of the largest (if not largest) food and nutrition conferences in the US. It is sponsored by AND (the Academy of Nutrition & Dietetics) and celebrates dietitians and other food and health professionals globally. There are updates on nutrition-related topics on weight management, diabetes, heart health, functional foods, culinary arts and more. It’s a 4-day event full of networking, new food products and cutting edge education.

This year it was held in downtown Philly, right near the famous Reading terminal market. Philly is full of history and great food. It could not have been a more perfect city to host this big foodie fest. The convention center in Philadelphia was massive but perfect to hold over 10.000 dietitians in attendance.

One thing “missing” this year (according to my friends and colleagues) was a food pun tee or swag booth. Almost every year, there is at least ONE company selling some form of food pun swag, be it tee shirts, mugs, totes or badge reels. This year, that was not present. Many food companies have adopted food puns, which brings me great joy.

I never miss an opportunity to wear and share my own line of food pun items. I will most certainly have a booth at the conference next year in Indianapolis. Serving Ohio as president this year took me to lots of meetings at FNCE, so the shirts did not make it, except on my own back. Stalker (shown here) got plenty of laughs.

In honor of FNCE, I’m offering a 19% discount on all food pun items until Friday at midnight. Grab a gift for a foodie friend. They are great for chefs, dietitians or anyone who loves to eat and has a sense of humor. Use FNCE19 at check out.

Let your plate prevent cancer

Let your plate prevent cancer

I had the opportunity earlier to talk with Dan Wells of Fox 19 about cancer prevention. It’s awfully hard to cover all the foods you should eat to prevent cancer (and why) in 3 minutes. So, below is a list of anti-oxidants in commonly eaten foods and why you should eat (or drink) them: Link to earlier segment: https://www.fox19.com/video/2019/09/19/healthy-foods-cancer-prevention/

  1. Green tea- contains catechins that have been found to reduce the risk of breast and other cancers.
  2. Coffee- contains polyphenols, compounds found to reduce the risk of liver and other gastrointestinal cancers. Take it black or with skim or 1% milk. Limit use of sugar and cream.
  3. Canned tomatoes, salsa or sauce- processed tomatoes have more bioavabilable (absorbable) lycopene- a phytochemical found to reduce prostate, ovarian and uterine cancer.
  4. Broccoli, kale, spinach, Brussels sprouts- contain indoles and sulfuraphane- two nutrients found to fight cancer. Leafy vegetable intake may reduce risk for lung cancer (so does smoking cessation)!
  5. Berries- blue and blackberries contain anthocyanin- a phyochemical that reduces risk for Alzheimers disease and cancer.
  6. Whole grains- go for farro, quinoa, barley, rolled oats, bulgur and other whole grains. These contain more selenium and vitamin E, which are known anti-oxidants. Get these nutrients from foods, not pills. Selenium supplements have been found to raise risk for diabetes.
  7. Be moderate with alcohol- alcohol is a known toxin in our diets. Moderate drinking means 1 drink/day for women, 2/day for men. To reduce breast cancer risk, cut the amount down further to 3 drinks/week.
  8. Yogurt and low-fat dairy products- yogurt contains pro-biotics to keep gut bacteria thriving. Dairy products are good sources of calcium, which helps reduce risk for colon cancer. Avoid excessive calcium intake from supplements or too much full-fat dairy. There is a link between high dairy intake (4 or more servings/day) and prostate cancer risk.
  9. Get moving- weight control and regular physical activity may help prevent cancer and cancer recurrence. You don’t have to be a gym rat, but regular walking, biking or other activity makes a difference.

 

Bada bing!

Bada bing!

I may not be wild about super muggy weather that makes my hair big and frizzy, but I love the season of summer. I love that my girls are not on a super strict schedule and we can be outside more often. I also love that I can wear a different tee shirt every day.

Summer also inspires my creative sense. There is so much beautiful produce to enjoy, and not just for eating. From cherries to zucchini, food is my muse! I love coming up with different food pun tee ideas. They are printed locally by DIY printing in Walnut Hills. https://www.diyprintingshop.com/index.html  Once printed, I spend at least one weekend a month at farmer’s markets and they are also placed in few small gift shops around the city including Jackson Whitacre, https://jacksonwhitacre.com/pages/contact-us Lamppost Cheese, http://lamppostcheese.com/ Kennedy Heights arts gift shop https://kennedyarts.org/ and the Civic Garden Center https://www.civicgardencenter.org/. 

I am also proud to support Cooking for the Family in OTR, a program that helps those suffering food insecurity, learn to cook. https://www.sfsministries.org/our-ministries/cooking-for-the-family/  10% of sales to go this program every quarter. Just $10 sponsors someone to take a 5-week cooking series. How cool is that?

Bada bing is my latest tee! Like the others, it is a soft, unisex gray tee that goes with pretty much anything. If you’re a cherry fan, you must treat yourself to one. https://soundbitesnutrition.com/product/bada-bing-short-sleeve-unisex-t-shirt/

Check out the other designs inspired by summer’s produce. You’re bound to find something you love to eat, and wear. https://soundbitesnutrition.com/shop

Health gains with whole grains

Health gains with whole grains

Look at any popular magazine these days and you’ll find at least one diet that bashes grains.  Whether it’s Paleo, the Military diet or the “whole 30”, someone, somewhere is out there trying to get you to eat a bun-less sandwich.  But what they may not realize is that anti-carb diets are a thing of the past.  Grains are back, and for good reason.

You can’t argue with science, especially when done right.  A recent study done at Tufts and published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that subjects consuming whole grains over refined grains burned more calories and absorbed less.  In addition, glucose tolerance was improved in whole grain consumers. 1 Other studies have shown lower rates of obesity and cancer in individuals eating a diet containing whole grains. 2

Susan Roberts, a professor of nutrition at Tufts and author of  http://www.instinctdiet.com believes Americans eat too many refined carbohydrates like white bread, pasta, pastries, and desserts, which contribute to overweight and obesity.   Other scientists agree.  Lauri Wright, an assistant professor in community and family health at the University of South Florida notes that whole grains are higher in antioxidants, which contribute to long term good health.

Rather than comparing weight changes in subjects, the Tufts study evaluated resting metabolic rate and energy (calorie) content in stool at the end of a 6-week study.  Participants were on average, 50+ years of age with a BMI of 25.6, which is slightly above normal, but not overweight.  Participants in both groups consumed about 2550 calories per day, but one group had 830 calories in whole grains while the other had 830 calories coming from refined grains.  The study found that whole grain eaters burned 40 calories more than their refined grain counterparts and lost ~50 calories in stool, resulting in a 92-calorie deficit.  If this deficit is carried over for a year, a 5.5 lb weight loss could be achieved. 1 A previous 2011 Harvard study of over 12,000 subjects in a whole grain study supported these results. 2

Most Americans miss the mark on fiber intake, consuming a mere 15 grams per day.  The subjects in the Tufts study that ate whole grains ate about 39 grams of fiber daily versus 21 grams in the refined carbohydrate group. 1 Researchers believe the feeling of fullness in whole grain consumers affects the brains’ ability to regulate metabolism.  Because your brain does not perceive that you are conserving energy, metabolism is not reduced.  This is good news for carb lovers.

Making the switch to whole grains can be as easy.  Swap brown rice or quinoa for white rice, or whole wheat pasta and bread for white bread or pasta.  Try bran or wheat-based cereals in place of corn or rice.  Whole grains are the new black.

References:

Karl, J Philip, Meydani, Mohsen, Barnett, Junaidah, Vanegas, Sally, Goldin, Barry, Kane, Anne, Rasmussen, Helen, Saltzmn, Edward, Vangay, Pajau, Knights, Dan, Chen, C-Y Oliver, Das, Sai Krupa, Jonnalagadda, Meydani, Simin and Roberts, Susan.  Substituting whole grains for refined grains in a 6-wk randomized trial favorably affects energy-balance metrics in healthy men and postmenopausal women.  American J of Clinical Nutrition, February 8, 2017, doi: 10.3945/​ajcn.116.139683

Mozaffarian, D, MD, Dr PH, Hao, Tao MPH, Rimm, Eric B, Willett, Walter MD, Dr PH, Hu, Frank MD, PhD.  Changes in Diet and Lifestyle and long term weight gain in men and women.  N Engl J Med 2011; 364:2392-2404.  June 23, 2011

Is added fiber good or bad?

Is added fiber good or bad?

I tend to talk a lot about fiber. We’ve all heard that eating a diet high in fiber is linked with lower risk of disease. But, there’s something not quite right about high fiber Pop tarts or other foods like yogurt, which normally don’t contain fiber. New research suggests adding highly processed fiber to already processed foods may impact human health in a negative way, including a risk for liver cancer. This is based on research completed at Georgia State University and the University of Toledo. 1

There’s plenty of proof that eating foods naturally high in fiber is good for your health. Fiber from the skins and flesh of plant-based foods (whole grains, fruits, vegetables, beans, nuts and seeds) has been found to aid in weight management, cholesterol and blood sugar reduction and reduced risk for certain types of cancer. Fiber also aids in feeding the microbiota (good bacteria) in our bowels, which keeps our immune systems humming. 2 As health-conscious consumers recognize that their diets aren’t cutting the mustard as far as fiber goes, the food industry is enriching foods with refined soluble fibers like inulin. A recent US FDA ruling has allowed foods with supplemental fiber to be marketed as healthy. Serious concerns about the safety of these added fibers has been come to light in this study. 1

The initial research was to evaluate a diet enriched with refined inulin on obesity-associated risks with mice. Although a diet containing inulin to help reduce obesity risk, the mice began developing jaundice and after 6 months, many developed liver cancer. 1

Dr. Matam Vijay-Kumar- the senior author of the study from the University of Toledo found the results surprising, but was open to the challenge of investigating the healthy impact of processed soluble fiber. Despite the study being conducted in mice, it has potential ramifications for human health, cautioning against the addition of enriching processed foods with refined, fermentable fiber. 1

According to Dr. Andrew Gewirtz, one of the study’s authors and professor in the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State, the research suggests that adding purified fibers to processed foods does not have the same health benefits of eating fruits and vegetables naturally high in soluble fiber. In fact, it may cause serious, life-altering liver cancer in some people. He believes that the FDA rule change which has encouraged marketing fiber-fortified food as healthy, is careless and should be better scrutinized. 1

In this study, chicory root, a form of inulin that we normally don’t consume, was used. The fiber goes through an extraction and chemical process. Rodents that developed liver cancer in the study were found to have previous dysbiosis or altered intestinal microbiota. This was suggested to play a vital role in the development of liver cancer. 1

This research suggests a need for further studies evaluating the effects of refined fiber, in particular on liver health.

The authors concluded that their research identified refined soluble fiber, while normally beneficial to good health, may also be harmful, leading to diseases like liver cancer, according to Dr. Benoit Chassaing, an assistant professor in the Neuroscience Institute of Georgia State. Fiber in general should not be seen as “bad” as the research sheds a light on fortified foods VS natural and that this type of fiber may be detrimental in some individuals with gut bacterial dysbiosis. 1

If you’re concerned about which fibers may be added to your foods, the following are FDA approved and considered safe.

  • Beta-glucan soluble fiber, also called oat bran fiber
  • Psyllium husk: a soluble fiber that may relieve constipation and help with diarrhea
  • Cellulose: a non-soluble fiber that helps you to feel full, so you eat less
  • Guar gum: a soluble fiber that is often used as a thickener in foods
  • Pectin: a water-soluble fiber often added to jams and jellies
  • Locust bean gum: also known as carob gum, a thickening agent found in sauces and cereals
  • Hydroxypropylmethylcellulose: a soluble fiber that is found in some gluten-free foods 3

References:

  1. Vishal Singh, Beng San Yeoh, Benoit Chassaing, Xia Xiao, Piu Saha, Rodrigo Aguilera Olvera, John D. Lapek, Limin Zhang, Wei-Bei Wang, Sijie Hao, Michael D. Flythe, David J. Gonzalez, Patrice D. Cani, Jose R. Conejo-Garcia, Na Xiong, Mary J. Kennett, Bina Joe, Andrew D. Patterson, Andrew T. Gewirtz, Matam Vijay-Kumar. Dysregulated Microbial Fermentation of Soluble Fiber Induces Cholestatic Liver Cancer. Cell, 2018; 175 (3): 679 DOI: 1016/j.cell.2018.09.004
  2. Slavin, J. Fiber and prebiotics: Mechanisms and health benefits. Nutrients. 2013 Apr; 5(4): 1417–1435.
  3. https://www.verywellfit.com/natural-vs-added-fiber-4155913

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