In your face!

In your face!

November is National Healthy Skin Month.   Why not “feed your face” something good to look younger?  Below are some tips to keep your face (and body) young and healthy.

  1. Peel an orange. Oranges and grapefruit are in season now, so enjoy them while they last.  A recent study shows that individuals who eat a diet rich in vitamin C have less wrinkles than those who don’t.  Tomatoes, bell peppers and broccoli are also great sources.
  2. Go Mediterranean. Olive oil, a staple in Mediterranean diets can be used topically to provide smoother skin.  When eaten, olive oil is rich in anti-oxidants that help reduce inflammation and stamp out free radicals, which can cause wrinkles.
  3. Enjoy a spot of green tea. Green tea is loaded with anti-inflammatory chemicals that may reduce your risk of skin cancer.  Squeeze some fresh lemon in your tea to boost the vitamin C content.
  4. Eat edamame. Green soybeans make a great snack and happen to contain a special fat (phosphatidylserine) that helps create collagen.  Enjoy as a snack or steam for a side dish.
  5. Get fishy. Fatty fish is a great source of omega-3 fatty acids, a fat that helps fight inflammation and improve skin tone.  Enjoy tuna, mackerel and salmon twice per week or more.
  6. Bottoms up! Adequate water helps hydrate your skin and prevent eczema.  Aim for 6-8 (8 oz) of water daily.
  7. Tame your sweet tooth. Excess sugar in your diet may inhibit the effectiveness of collagen, which can increase the risk of wrinkles.  Choose fresh or dried fruit when your sweet tooth kicks in and limit intake of junk like cake, cookies, pastries and other high sugar treats.
  8. Curb your cocktails. Alcohol is not only dehydrating, it can wreck your sleep, leaving you with dry skin and dark circles under your eyes.  Be moderate in your cocktail consumption this season.
  9. Turn away from trans. Trans fat (from processed foods) is linked with heart disease and some cancers, and can also age your skin.  Limit fast food and avoid products containing hydrogenated oils.
  10. Decaf a bit. Excessive coffee, tea or soda consumption can cause dehydration, which results in dry, sallow skin.  Enjoy a cup in the morning, but switch to decaf (or water) for the rest of the day.
Embrace the season!

Embrace the season!

I am so thankful it’s almost fall. Growing up in Northeastern Ohio, summers weren’t quite as hot as they are in Cincinnati. To me, once the neighborhood pool is closed, I am done with super hot weather. Not to mention what it does to my hair. Not pretty.

In addition to the difference in weather growing up, our grocery stores didn’t stock the same produce you see now. Today, you can get strawberries in winter and citrus fruit in summer. Food is available regardless of season. It just doesn’t seem right! When I was a kid, the change in weather was just one sign the season was changing. The biggest one for us was what was brought home from the store.

While strawberries are plentiful, they’re also going to be much higher priced and not as sweet as their season fades. The same holds true for asparagus. Bananas are available all year round since they are shipped from Central America anyway. This time of year, take advantage of apples, pears and melon as they’re at their peak season to be picked and consumed. Other seasonal produce includes beets, peppers, tomatoes and squash.

The beauty of changing seasons is experiencing different flavors as well as the nutritional benefits of various produce. Apples are an excellent source of fiber and eating one daily has been found to reduce the risk of stroke. Oranges and other citrus fruit are high in vitamin C as well as potassium, a nutrient found to lower blood pressure and aid in muscle recovery. Tomatoes and bell peppers are also a good source of vitamin C, so don’t limit yourself this season.

If you need different ways to season fruits and vegetables, keep a few spices on hand like cinnamon or nutmeg for apples or pears, ginger for butternut squash and green beans or garlic for kale and fresh tomato sauce. Peppers are delightful when sautéed in olive oil with onions or garlic. Add them to sandwiches, pizza or pasta to add color and nutrients to your meal.

Whatever you choose to eat (seasonal or not), go for a variety of fruits and vegetables every day. It’s your best defense to prevent chronic diseases like obesity, cancer, diabetes and heart disease that plague our society.

Low FODMAPS Diet for IBS

Low FODMAPS Diet for IBS

It seems as though the number of people complaining of (and being diagnosed with) IBS (Irritable Bowel Syndrome) has gone up. IBS is a condition of the large intestine (colon) that may cause pain, bloating, gas, constipation and/or diarrhea. And while IBS does not cause permanent damage to your large bowel, it can make you miserable when it flares up. Scientists recognize that stress has an impact on IBS and reducing stress will certainly help in managing IBS, but so can diet.

In the past five to ten years, scientists have discovered that reducing certain types of carbohydrates may help alleviate the symptoms of IBS. These carbohydrates are known as FODMAPS. The term FODMAP sounds strange, but stands for Fermentable carbohydrates, Oligo-saccharides, Di-saccharides, Mono-saccharides and Polyols. Foods containing these types of carbohydrates may be poorly absorbed in those with IBS.

Foods containing lactose (dairy) as well as high amounts of fructose (fruit) may exacerbate IBS. Gallacto-oligosaccharides in beans, lentils and soybeans may also increase gas production in the colon, exacerbating IBS. Polyols from sugar-free products (read sorbitol or mannitol, often found in gum) as well as cherries, apricots and apples may affect IBS as well. In addition, gluten (found in wheat, rye and products containing barley) may also be poorly absorbed in those with IBS. And while it pains me to have an image of “NO APPLES”, this is only meant as a guide for people with IBS. Typically an elimination diet is followed for at least 4 weeks, then suspect foods are added back in slowly to evaluate their effect on the gut. Below are a few more examples of a low FODMAPS diet.

Bite this:
Almond, rice or soy milk. These dairy-free products are low in lactose, which appears to be poorly absorbed in those with IBS.
Not that:
Cow’s milk. Cow’s milk contains lactose, as does yogurt and ice cream. Soymilk may contain galacto-oligosaccharides, which are not absorbed well.
Bite this:
Green beans, kale, lettuce, spinach, tomato, zucchini, cucumbers, carrots, eggplant, Swiss chard, bok choy, bean sprouts. All are low in inulin, a substance that can increase gas and bacteria production in the large bowel.
Not that:
Artichoke, asparagus, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, garlic, onions, peppers, sugar snap peas. These contain inulin, which may promote gas production. Avoid breakfast or snack bars containing inulin or chickory root as well.
Bite this:
Bananas, blueberries, cantaloupe, Clementines, grapes, grapefruit, kiwi, oranges, papaya, pineapple and strawberries. These are lower in fructose.
Not that:
Apples, apricots, cherries, figs, peaches, mango, pears, plum, watermelon. All are higher in fructose, which may increase gas production.
Bite this:
Corn or rice-based pasta, corn flakes, puffed rice, oatmeal, oat bran, rice, quinoa, buckwheat, tapioca. These foods are gluten-free.
Not that:
Wheat, wheat bread or pasta, bran cereal, shredded wheat, rye-containing products, barley, beer. All contain gluten, a protein found to be poorly absorbed in those suffering IBS. Read the label for products containing wheat or gluten.
Bite this:
Cashews and pistachios. These are lowest in galacto-saccharides.
Not that:
Peanuts, pecans, walnuts, pumpkin seeds. The jury is still out on almonds, macadamia and other nuts. If you find that they increase your discomfort, cut them from your diet for a few weeks to see if it helps.
For a more complete guide to FODMAPS, click on the link below.
http://www.ibsgroup.org/brochures/fodmap-intolerances.pdf

Beware of these vegetable “based” recipes!

Beware of these vegetable “based” recipes!

It’s picnic season, which means backyard BBQs, cocktail parties and lots of appetizers and dips. But what exactly are you serving? It may be called veggie dip, but is it really veggie-based? Below are some popular dips and a few tips to clean them up.

Spinach dip (made with mayonnaise, sour cream and Knorr’s vegetable soup mix). The spinach is a powerhouse, but sadly, it is drowning in fat and sodium from mayonnaise, sour cream and salty soup mix. You can lighten it up easily by subbing plain Greek, non-fat yogurt for sour cream and light mayonnaise for regular. Use just half a packet of Knorr’s soup mix to reduce the sodium content.

Artichoke dip– Artichokes provide awesome pre-biotics in your diet, which help feed healthy pro-biotic bacteria in the gut. Unfortunately, the dip is typically laden with cream cheese, mayonnaise and Parmesan cheese. Would you even realize a vegetable was in there? Lighten it up with Greek yogurt cream cheese (found at Kroger), light mayonnaise and 1/3 less cheese in the recipe. I doubt you’d notice a taste change.

Zucchini bread– most quick breads are fairly high in sugar and calories. Just because a vegetable has been shredded into the batter, does not make it health food. The same goes for carrot cake, which is one of the richest desserts on the planet!

Broccoli, Ramen Noodle Slaw– while this looks like it should be healthy, it really is not. Broccoli slaw is very nutritious and a good source of vitamin C and fiber. But when paired with Ramen noodles, butter, slivered almonds, canola oil and sugar, it should not be featured as health food. Ramen noodles are high in sodium and saturated fat (even without the seasoning packet). When you add the seasoning, the sodium content goes through the roof.

If you really want to keep things simple (and healthy), purchase some ready-made, yogurt based dips from Sabra or other brands. You won’t even miss that blob of mayonnaise.

5 tips to prevent cancer

5 tips to prevent cancer

Just about everyone I know has been touched by cancer. Whether it was a parent, a cousin, a neighbor, a co-worker, a child or themselves, it seems to single no one out. News of cancer hit my family this week and it got me thinking. Why? While many are cancers can be hereditary, (breast, ovarian, colon), several, if not all, have some lifestyle component, which means prevention. Below are some tips to beat the big C.

1. Maintain a healthy weight. This doesn’t mean you have to reduce down to your unrealistic high school fighting weight, but being overweight or obese does increase risk for cancer, especially breast, prostate and colon. Lose weight gradually- give up soda and evening snacks, drink more water, reduce big portions. Get up and move. Every pound makes a difference.

2. Eat more fruits & vegetables. If it’s one thing we can all use more of, it’s plants. Dark, green leafy vegetables are full of cancer-fighting phytochemicals and anti-oxidants, and they’re so easy to incorporate into your meals. Add a pile of spinach to your eggs, add broccoli, tomatoes and peppers in your salad. Throw some kale in your smoothie. Just eat more daily.

3. Less alcohol, more green tea. It’s funny how most of us would find it shameful to drink 3 (12 oz.) sodas in one night, but have no issues with drinking 3-6 beers at a time. While I’m not advocating soda intake by any means, it is clear that our society encourages and celebrates alcohol without considering the consequences. Did you know that just one drink a day for women has been found to boost breast cancer risk by 11%? Excessive alcohol intake has been implicated in stomach, pancreas and other gastrointestinal cancers. Green tea on the other hand, has been linked with reduction in several types of cancers including lung, brain and breast. Aim for 3 or more cups of green tea per day. It may also aid in weight management- another boon!

4. Exercise. If there’s one thing that will keep you alive and kicking longer in this world, it’s movement. Regular physical activity helps manage weight, which aids in cancer reduction. Regular exercise has been found to reduce risk for colon cancer as well as breast cancer recurrence in women. Walk, ride a bike, swim or enjoy some other activity at least 30 minutes a day.

5. Eat less animal foods– especially red meat and full fat dairy. Do you really need another study linking bacon and beef with cancer? You don’t have to go vegan, but reducing processed, cured meat and red meat certainly won’t hurt. While you’re at it, go easy on full fat milk, cheese, butter and ice cream. Saturated fat not only ups your cancer risk, but is not so great for your arteries or brain in the long run, either. Just remember, #moreplantslesscow.

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